CORFO: Madre de Dios Archipelago – July 2016

CORFO: Madre de Dios Archipelago – July 2016

A beautiful video that was filmed during the expedition by Geográfica Producciones.

A glance at the diving expedition carried out at the Madre de Dios Archipelago in July 2016 for the CORFO INNOVA – CEQUA – SERNATUR Aysén / Magallanes Project about developing underwater tourism in cold water regions.
Director: Ernesto Davis
Biologist: Mathias Hüne
Audiovisual: Fernando Luchsinger

Acknowledgements: Expedición Fitz Roy and to M/N Forrest
Fundación Huinay: Francine Beaujot – Rodrigo Sánchez

A Family of Explorers

A Family of Explorers

Overall the expedition is a huge success, both for the oceanographic team and for the divers! We return to Punta Arenas with big smiles and incredible memories.

Swimming Amongst the ´Bergs

Swimming Amongst the ´Bergs

We are lucky enough to be able to approach two glacier on the expedition, Amalia Glacier and Rengo Glacier and we can’t resist putting our drysuits on the go for a dip in the icy water.

A Job Well Done

A Job Well Done

We celebrate being done with our work in Canal Copihue and enjoy the sights. We were happy to step foot on land to assist with some freshwater collections.

Recruiting Life

Recruiting Life

After swapping out the two current meters in two different sites we began the process of photographing the long term monitoring experiments. To our surprise some of the recruitment plates we put out in March 2016 already had some life on them! Some anemones (closed up in this picture) are happy to colonize the free space.

Life-Saving Kelp

Life-Saving Kelp

Even though we had little difficulty working in the currents it doesn’t mean they weren’t strong! Here is a photo of Rodrigo holding onto kelp during our safety stop at 5 meters depth in order to prevent drifting away from the boat.

Swapping out the Current Meters

Swapping out the Current Meters

We changed the current meters relatively quickly with zero complications on the same mornings that we set up during HF28. The current meters are held vertically in the water column by buoys that remain 5 meters below the surface. In order to swap out the current meter we had to device a pulley system with a sliding knot to take the tension out of the line before we could do the swap.

Taking Advantage of the Current

Taking Advantage of the Current

Finally we made it to the beautiful Canal Copihue. The currents this time around felt less severe, probably because we didn’t have to use the pneumatic drill. We were able to time our dives with the current and take advantage of the currents in order to carry us from one dive site to the other all while at 20m.

A Waiting Game

A Waiting Game

Marine life in this area is stunning and we patiently wait, preparing and planning for our dives in Canal Copihue. The mission of this expedition is to change the current meters that are currently in place so the new ones can continue recording data and the data from the old ones can be offloaded. While we are there we have to take the monitoring photos of all the fixed frame sites, and of the recruitment plates.

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